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(2014) Fichte and transcendental philosophy, Dordrecht, Springer.

Fichte's transcendental justification of human rights

James Clarke

pp. 242-256

Human rights (or natural rights) are justified claims or entitlements to certain fundamental goods or benefits.1 They impose obligations on all other human beings and normative constraints on all political and social institutions. All human beings possess these rights equally, simply in virtue of being human, and independently of the positive law of the societies in which they live. These rights are said to be inalienable and imprescriptible.

Publication details

DOI: 10.1057/9781137412232_16

Full citation [Harvard style]:

Clarke, J. (2014)., Fichte's transcendental justification of human rights, in T. Rockmore & D. Breazeale (eds.), Fichte and transcendental philosophy, Dordrecht, Springer, pp. 242-256.

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