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189910

(2016) Information cultures in the digital age, Dordrecht, Springer.

Hermeneutics and information science

the ongoing journey from simple objective interpretation to understanding data as a form of disclosure

Matthew Kelly

pp. 83-110

This chapter looks to provide a selective history of some of the ways in which the use of hermeneutics can be deployed to provide a general ontology of information. An attempt is made to show how and why Capurro's early work remains important to such a project, and how his constant and consistent reminders over four decades to the information community to keep re-evaluating its sense of praxis, its easily assumed conventionality, its self-declared limitations and its scientific and phenomenologically-assessable normativity all remain distinctly relevant. Through a close reading of Capurro's Hermeneutik der Fachinformation, I try to show how Capurro's place in the historic continuum of information hermeneutics should be acknowledged and to provide a short outline of areas of similarity and difference in the focus of a number of significant arguments made subsequently. I conclude with a brief discussion of how hermeneutic understanding and hermeneutically-informed methodology might continue to offer solutions to problems associated with the social practices that are embedded within information science.

Publication details

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-658-14681-8_5

Full citation [Harvard style]:

Kelly, M. (2016)., Hermeneutics and information science: the ongoing journey from simple objective interpretation to understanding data as a form of disclosure, in M. Kelly & J. Bielby (eds.), Information cultures in the digital age, Dordrecht, Springer, pp. 83-110.

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