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(2002) The Stanford encyclopedia of philosophy, Stanford, Stanford University Press.

AlFred Schutz

Michael Barber

Alfred Schutz, more than any other phenomenologist, attempted to relate the thought of Edmund Husserl to the social world and the social sciences. His Phenomenology of the Social World supplied philosophical foundations for Max Weber's sociology and for economics, with which he was familiar through contacts with colleagues of the Austrian school. When Schutz fled Hitler's Anschluss of Austria and immigrated to the United States in 1939, he developed his thought further in relationship to the social sciences, American pragmatism, logical empiricism, and to various other fields of endeavor such as music and literature. His work has been influential on new movements in sociological thought such as ethnomethodology and conversation analysis.

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Full citation [Harvard style]:

Barber, M. (2002)., AlFred Schutz, in E. Zalta (ed.), The Stanford encyclopedia of philosophy, Stanford, Stanford University Press, pp. n/a.

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